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Ecology & Safety, Volume 10, 2016

AIRBORNE TRANSPORT OF BACTERIAL SPORES AND FUNGAL CONIDIA ON NATURAL AND MAN-MADE FIBERS
Rafal L. Górny, Malgorzata Golofit-Szymczak, Marcin Cyprowski, Agata Stobnicka, Anna Lawniczek-Walczyk
Pages: 63-75
Published: 7 Jun 2016
Views: 810
Downloads: 245
Abstract: Bacteria and fungi together with the structures and substances they produce may exert a harmful influence upon exposed individuals leading to numerous adverse health outcomes. As far as a transport of microbial agents on dust particles is relatively widely studied, a role of fibers as their carrier is not well recognized. Natural and man-made fibers’ structure and arrangement supporting such transport were described based on samples derived from both occupational and nonoccupational environments. The ability of fibers to convey microbial propagules loaded with different number of elementary charges in both dry and humid air was studied in newly built aerosolization chamber. The results showed that from 1g of fibers in natural state is possible to isolate up to 9×105 culturable microbes, including pathogens. Tested fibers (especially natural ones) were able to transport in the air up to 100 bacterial spores or fungal conidia per 1 fiber.
Keywords: fibers, microorganisms, electrical charge, airborne transport, air humidity
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