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Language, Individual & Society, Volume 13, 2019

INCORPORATING E–LEARNING IN TEACHING ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE TO PHD STUDENTS
Sylwia Stachurska
Pages: 215-231
Published: 20 Nov 2019
Views: 134
Downloads: 25
Abstract: A foreign language (FL) learning is an extremely complex and multifaceted phenomenon. It can be seen throughout the history of language teaching that approaches and methods have been constantly replaced by another and presumably more appropriate and up– to– date set of theories, ideas and practices. Recent technological and infrastructural developments influence teacher’s work and often change the teacher’s own belief and understanding. Blending of methods in FL and creating the teacher’s own method is recommended by many methodologists. This posits e–learning ripe for exploration. Online learning is a pedagogical approach that allows students to facilitate learning and improves their performance by creating, using, and managing appropriate technological processes and resources. In this respect, the e–learning approach is favored in some graduate programs or in postgraduate courses. The focus of this paper is on incorporating e–learning in teaching English as a foreign language to PhD students. Moreover, it reveals the students’ opinion about the approach itself. There were 16 PhD students who took part in the five months experiment. They participated in English as a FL e–learning course on Moodle platform. The students were administered a questionnaire. Additionally, the Moodle tracking system recorded all the students’ performances. The paper reveals the results of the study. Conclusions from the experiment and suggestions for possible follow–up investigations are proposed in the final part of this paper.
Keywords: e–learning, post–method approach, principled eclecticism, personal practical knowledge
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