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Economy & Business, Volume 13, 2019

THE CONSIDERATION OF STUDENTS’ AS WORKERS AND THE ROLE OF UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT ALONG WITH THE YEAR OF STUDY TOWARDS THE EXAMINATION OF BURNOUT
Dimitra Ap. Georgiou, Ioannis Katsenos, George S. Androulakis
Pages: 258-272
Published: 5 Oct 2019
Views: 132
Downloads: 25
Abstract: The role of the university department and students’ year of birth and year of study in relation to burnout syndrome has been examined thoroughly. In this paper it is assumed that students are considered as workers and that the studies are analogously their work. Correspondingly, the years of study are proportional to both the student's age and the characteristics of the workload to. In this regard, a structured questionnaire was answered by 582 students of the University of Patras whose answers were analysed via an exploratory factor analysis. The aim was to deconstruct the phenomenon of students’ burnout in its causal structural elements and to examine the impact of the university department and the year of study on each of these elements. The results showed that the university department affects the students' burnout syndrome via three channels: efficacy and self-accomplishment of studies, lack of interest in university studies and via the difficulty in collaborating with their fellow students and their tutors. Additionally, it appeared that the year of study had a significant effect on students’ burnout syndrome, mainly because of physical and psycho-emotional exhaustion· the greatest effect was found in the penultimate year of study.
Keywords: students’ burnout, university department, year of studies, questionnaire, exploratory factor analysis
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